• friends of the Newlyn Archive

    Amongst the Friends of the Archive, are a number of people who are willing to display and discuss their very
    considerable private archives at the Open Days.

    Here a small group of Friends listen to Jeff Richards (seated middle) as he shows his album of Newlyn
    postcards at the Open Day Fishing at Newlyn held in February 2010.

  • Newlyn Archive open days

    Partner institutions like the Newlyn Art Gallery and Penlee House Gallery have participated in Newlyn Archive Open Days.

    Here a member of the team at Newlyn Art Gallery works with a child on a project about Seaside Voices at the Open Day Faces of Newlyn held in January 2010.

  • Become a Friend of the Newlyn Archive.

    Friends of the Newlyn Archive are actively involved in creating and fashioning the Newlyn Archive by participating in events, adding to the archive resources, or taking responsibility for research in particular areas of the archive.

    Linda Holmes is a Friend of the Archive whose Penwith family roots go back to the seventeenth century. Here she is with membership secretary Diane Tredinnick talking to a visitor at the June 2010 Open Day Newlyn at War.

  • The Newlyn Archive is a collection of material about Newlyn.

    The purpose of the archive is to collect, preserve, store and share stories, documents, and pictures relating to the history of Newlyn from distant times until today.

    William Badcock was one of the crew of seven men who sailed the lugger Mystery to Australia in 1854. Here he is back in Newlyn with his wife Harriet.

  • Newlyn Archive open days

    Four annual Open Days, with free admission, focus on a chosen theme, and enable people to enjoy and learn from the archive holdings.

    Here are people at the Newlyn Family Open Day held in November 2011; they are engrossed with the old school photographs showing classes from the Wesleyan School, Newlyn Board School, Trewarveneth Infants andTolcarne School (now Newlyn School).

  • Friends of the Archive

    Friends of the Archive elect a committee of volunteers that includes a chairman, treasurer, secretary, and six
    ordinary committee members, four of whom take responsibility for membership, local liaison, publicity and
    telephone contact. The archivist is an ex officio member of the committee.

    Here is treasurer, Ron Hogg outside the Fishermen’s Rest where the archive held its exhibition as part of theParty on the Pier in March 2012.

  • Newlyn Archive activities

    A wide range of people including young people are involved in particular projects, both learning from and contributing to their community archive.

    Here the children from Newlyn School are accompanied by archive secretary Mary Ellery on a walk along the Tolcarne Stream as part of the Bygone Newlyn Project in 2011.

  • Jan Ruhrmund

    The Archive also provides exhibition material at annual public events held locally such as the Newlyn Fish Festival and the Party on the Pier (British Tourism) or at one‐off events such as the Passmore Edward Centenary that was held at Newlyn Art Gallery in 2011.

    Here is Jan Ruhrmund the Penzance Mayor signing the visitors book with Pam Lomax (seated) at the Newlyn Fish Festival, August 2010.

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A Busy Period July-August 2016

Posted in Newlyn Archive News

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Above: Visitors at the Newlyn Archive Open Day

To-ing and Fro-ing

The third Open Day of the year, 'To-ing and Fro-ing', on July 16 2016, proved to be a great success, in spite of it being hot and sunny outside (perfect beach weather), and also with it being Lafrowda day at St Just.

141 people turned up to enjoy the exhibits, which included pictures of horse drawn carts and wagonettes, old motor cars at Lamorna and Newlyn buses, fishing boats and mine engines and people marching to-and-fro.

The film show was very pertinent with the opportunity to view the locality from an old car being driven around West Cornwall, or seeing the amazing machine called the Dreckly Express that travels underground in a tunnel to take goods to the top of St Michael's Mount.

The display books were very popular with many people engrossed in their content throughout the day. A solid core of regulars attended, but there were quite number of new faces (including young people) and the committee were kept busy answering queries about family history and other things. It was great to see groups of people standing around discussing the exhibits, and sitting at the tables drinking coffee and having a good old chat. (David Tredinnick reporting).

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Above: Brian Newton waits for visiitors at the Newlyn Archive Tent

Marazion Carnival

On July 31 2016, on a very sunny Sunday morning, members of Newlyn Archive set off to Marazion Annual Carnival. The transport was loaded up with tables, chairs, display boards and a large gazebo to arrive at 0900. On arrival we were given our pitch and local volunteers assisted in the setting up of our gazebo and tables. I would like to thank the Marazion Carnival Committee for allowing the Archive to have the pitch free of charge (normally £35-£45).

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Above: Denny Harvey and Pam Lomax at the Newlyn Archive Tent 

It was a beautifully sunny day and the carnival was extremely busy with many thousands of visitors and local families. The Newlyn Archive display was active with visitors from as early as 10.30 even though the festivities didn't really start until 12 o'clock. There was a steady flow of visitors throughout the day with people from as far as Mexico, Holland and various places around the United Kingdom. We had local people eager to talk about the material on the display boards including a gentleman who worked at Levant and Geevor mines who incidentally worked with my grandfather many years ago. He told us many tales of mining and the old smuggler tunnels that exist around Pendeen. A local Marazion man told a story of a man from Newlyn who used to sell fish in Marazion when he was growing up. He used to come over by horse and cart and dip the fish in Red River to freshen them up before selling them to the locals.

The day was a great success for the Archive, promoting its work to the other side of Mount's Bay. A lot of local people said they would look at our web site for details of the next exhibition. Many thanks to all that helped on the day. (Denny Harvey reporting).

 

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To-ing and Fro-ing, Saturday 16 July 2016

Posted in Newlyn Archive Events

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The photo of WJ Olds, Butcher in his horse-drawn cart outside the Kings Arms, Paul is just one of the many examples of T0-ING and FRO-ING in the exhibition at the next Newlyn Archive Open Day 'To-ing and Fro-ing: getting there and getting back' at Trinity Centre on Saturday July 16 2016, 10-3.00.

The Exhibition tells the story of transport through the ages as it affected the people who lived at Newlyn and round about Newlyn.

First and foremost, were the fishing boats like the lugger PE 233 Mystery that took seven men to Australia in 1854.

For speed and sea worthiness, Newlyn luggers could not be excelled. In 1885 a Newlyn lugger sailed from Scarborough in less than 72 hours. In 1890 three luggers sailed the 600 miles to Scarborough in 70 hours.

As the fishing industry prospered and the new piers were built there were 'Bird' boats with names like Auk, Albatross, Crane, Drake, Gannet, Guillemot, Mallard, Petrel, Philomel, Raven, and Stork that took pilchards from Newlyn to Genoa

From earliest times, fishing was the most important industry in Newlyn. Horse-drawn vehicles took fish from the fish auctions on the beach at Newlyn to Penzance station for dispatch to the London markets. Before the 1914 war most people at Newlyn relied on these carrier's carts or on horse drawn wagonettes. Blanche Brown, who was born in 1906 explained that if a woman could afford 2d for a ride to market in the wagonette she would do so, but halfway up Morrab Road she had to get out and walk the steepest part, as the wagonette was pulled by a single horse. Once the wagonette got to the flat, the passengers could get in again; and coming home, they could board the wagon at the top of Morrab Road and ride straight through to the bridge in Newlyn.

Newlyn did not have its first motor bus until December 1919, run by the Hitchens family at Tolcarne. The bus ran from the First and Last Hotel in Penzance through Newlyn and on to Mousehole. The vehicle, registered AF2381, was named Porth Enys, the old name for Mousehole. In 1922 there was competition from the Harvey family of Mousehole who set up their own bus company, and in 1926 the Western National Omnibus Company set up its headquarters at Wherry Town.

There was to-ing and fro-ing below ground as many Newlyn men worked in the mines when fishing was bad. The off-shore Wherry Mine had a long timber trestle over the sea for access. In other mines on the North Coast, miners who worked deep down could have travelled on the reciprocating man engine, which sometimes took as long as 50 minutes to get to the bottom of the shaft, with the men stepping on and off at regular intervals. Below ground there might have been a tramway with wagons to load the tin and sometimes there would be donkeys to pull the heavy wheeled containers.

Janner Maddern to-ed and fro-ed as he drove the engine named after him from Penlee Quarry to Newlyn's South Pier pulling wagons full of stone to load on to the 'Brook' stone boats, which had names like Caernarvonbrook, Chesterbrook, Clarebrook, Corkbrook, Cornishbrook, Dorsetbrook, Glenbrook, Somersetbrook, Stirlingbrook, Warwickbrook, Westminsterbrook, Winchesterbrook, and Worcesterbrook.

The Exhibition gives many other glimpses of 'to-ing and fro-ing' and there will be display books and film shows on the day so please 'To and Fro' to Trinity Centre on Saturday. You can downlaod the poster by clicking on the PDF file below.

pdfPoster.pdf08/07/2016, 09:20